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Contact Us

Our physicians and staff are here to answer any of your questions. You can call us directly to coordinate the best time for your visit or to ask any follow-up questions. You can also email us using the form below. We will be checking emails throughout the day and will be in touch within 24 hours.

  • Medical Center Hours

  • Mon-Wed 7:30am-4:30pm
  • Thu 7:30-6:00pm
  • Fri 7:30am-4pm
  • Medical Center Phone

  • Phone 804.282.8510
  • Fax 804.285.5750
  • Aesthetic Center Hours

  • Mon-Fri 8am-4:30pm
  • Aesthetic Center Phone

  • Phone 804.285.2320
  • Phone Hours

  • Mon-Thu 7:00am-4:30pm
  • Fri 7:30am-4:00pm

Vitiligo

Vitiligo (vit-uh-lie-go) causes the skin to lose its natural color. Patches of lighter skin appear. Some people develop a few patches. Others lose much more skin color.

Vitiligo can also affect other parts of your body. A section of hair can turn white. Some people lose color inside their mouths. Even an eye can lose some of its color.

What causes this color loss is still a mystery. We do know that vitiligo is not contagious. It is not life-threatening.

But vitiligo can be life-altering. Some people develop low self-esteem. They may no longer want to hang out with friends. They can develop serious depression. Most people have vitiligo for life, so it’s important to develop coping strategies.

A coping strategy that helps many people is to learn about vitiligo. Another helpful strategy is to connect with others who have vitiligo.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Can a child with vitiligo be treated?

Yes, but some treatments are not appropriate for children.

The following may be an option for a child:

• Medicine applied to the skin.
• PUVA that uses psoralen applied to the skin. PUVA therapy that uses the psoralen pill is usually not recommended until after 12 years of age. Even then, the risk and benefits of this treatment must be carefully weighed.
• For children with extensive vitiligo, a dermatologist may recommend narrowband UVB light treatments.

Are researchers looking for more effective treatment?

Yes. They are studying the genes involved in vitiligo. Researchers believe that by identifying all of the genes involved in vitiligo, they will learn what destroys the cells that give skin its color. With this knowledge, it should be possible to develop better treatments. One of the key goals of this research is to develop a treatment that will permanently stop the skin from losing color.

We are here to answer all of your questions and make personalized recommendations. Contact us today!

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